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're already important for us. because many conflicts are around us. so therefore our attempt, our word and our insistence to contribute to the solution of the problems is appreciated. >> couric: and the prime minister of the palestinian authority, salam fayyad. >> it's one that's based definitely on dealing violence out of the equation for sure. that's our interest. that's how we defined it. from our point of view. it happens to be consistent with obligations that we took on the road map and going back to 1993. it's in our best interest, we're not doing no one else a favor but ourselves when we subscribe to nonviolence. as a really key component to what we have to do to get to freedom. >> couric: a program note: our interview with the c.e.o. of google, eric schmidt, will be seen at a later date. tonight, the president of turkey and the prime minister of the palestinian authority when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: abdullah gul is here, he's the president of turkey, a key u.s. ally and nato member, turke
mercedes benz lives by to this day. the best, or nothing. that is what drives us. >> additional funding provided by these funders. >> and by bloomberg. a provider of multimedia news and information services worldwide. ♪ >> from our studios in new york city, this is "charlie rose." ♪ >> charlie: sebastian pinera was elected president of chile in january with a mandate to create jobs and bolster the economy. he is chile's third richest citizen. 13 days before he took office, his country suffered one of the most devastating earthquakes in recorded history. he dubbed himself the reconstruction president and made earthquake recovery his top priority. he is here in new york for the united nations general assembly. i am very pleased to have him here at this table for the first time. first of all, welcome. >> thank you, charlie. >> charlie: tell me about the earthquake and how you approached that. >> it was the fifth worst earthquake in the known history of mankind, and it s devastating. it was 10 days before we took office, and it really cost us first of all more than 500 lives. there are
. and it may have been the lowest of the four elections held since u.s. forces ousted the taliban in 2001. there were also allegations of rampant fraud. >> we have seen ballot stuffing, proxy vote, underage voting, and also multiple voting. the most serious one is the ballot stuffing. our observers have observed in more than-- in around 280 centers in 28 provinces where the ballot stuffing did occur. >> reporter: afghanistan's leading election observation group called today for an independent investigation. also today president karzai spokesmen agreed that the fraud allegations warranted a second look. >> like any other election anywhere in the world this there are complaints there have been irregularities. but we are waiting for the respective organizations to investigate these complaints. and they should be the source of information to the afghan people about the existence of irregularities or fraud. >> reporter: at the same time, the afghan electoral commission criticized observer groups for being too quick to imply the election was tainted. still former foreign minister abdullah abdul
of the atmosphere every year. bnsf, theen engine that connects us. >> chevron. this is the power of human energy. >> intel. sponsors of tomorrow. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation, supporting science, technology and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: president obama spent this labor day in the midwest to rally with union members and unveil a new plan to promote job growth. but even as he sharpend his focus on the economy, his political opponents sharpened their responses. >> around the nation this holiday, parades, barbecues and a continuing unease over the dismal jobs market. coming just after friday's report showing unemployment had edgeded up again to 9.6%, this was a labor day in which the state of the american work force was very much front and center. with that in mind and with a mid-term election just two months off
in disguise because it has forced us to double of rate of our productivity and have no doubt that inherent in our spirit the more enemies we have, the more united and hard we work. >> rose: mahmoud ahmadinejad for the hour. next. >> rose: mahmoud ahmadinejad, the president of iran, is back in new york city. the rituals of his yearly visit are now familiar. he speaks to members of the press, he holds breakfast meetings and a lot of other meetings at the united nations. he address it is u.n. general assembly. his strip often accompanied by developing events. this year was the release of american hiker sarah shourd while two other hikers-- shane bauer and joshua fatale-- remain in an iranian jail accused of espionage. iran has been sanctioned four times by the security council for its failure to comply with the u.n. nuclear investigative agency the i.a.e.a. the obama administration, europe japan and even some arab nations have followed with some additional sanctions. some are very clear that a military strike should remain on the table if the sanctions does not work. one of those is former pr
in europe and the possible threat in the u.s. >> brown: margaret warner examines china's growing economic and military assertiveness in asia and globally. >> they're breaking diplomatic egg which is three or four years ago they would not have broken. so i think the change is palpable. >> woodruff: we talk to former clinton administration secretary of labor robert reich-- the last in our series of conversations on extending the bush-era tax breaks. >> brown: and jonathan miller of "independent television news" reports from northwest pakistan, where relief-aid is still slow in coming two months after the floods began. >> this is one of the worst affected areas in pakistan, but these people industrial no safe water, no food, no shelter, no medicine. something has gone very wrong. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> i want to know what the universe... >> looks like. >> feels like. >> from deep space. >> to a microbe. >> i can contribute to the world by pursuing my passion for science. >> it really is the key to the
sergeant olaf schmidt. >> almost a third happened here. in sangin. we join british and u.s. marines as they prepared for one of their last joint patrols. for a final few days, they must brave their demons and reflect on the sacrifices that have been made. commanders were keen to show was they've achieved, how the area has proffered prospered, how much safer it's become. but this is what we saw. a long and brutal fight throughout much of the day. it doesn't happen all the time anymore, but it shows the taliban still battling coalition troops. and now america must try to finish the job britain started. no british troops were injured this time but they faced too many days like this. >> i find it very difficult to talk about actually having someone have been there, you can't describe the smells, the sights, there's no way to describe all this, even pictures don't seem to work. you have to actually be there and go through the emotions to have a true understanding of what the people here go,000. >> handing over to the americans is a bittersweet moment for the troops. they're happy to be g
of the atmosphere every year. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the health care reform law reached a kind of anniversary today, six months since president obama signed it into law, big new changes are set to take effect. health correspondent betty ann bowser has the story. >> hey, everybody. hello, hello! good to see you guys! >> reporter: the president marked the occasion in a northern virginia neighborhood today. his goal: to sell the six-month- old law to voters, six weeks before the mid-term elections. >> and so what we realized was we had to take some steps to start dealing with these underlying, chronic problems that have confronted our economy for a very long time. and health care was one of those issues that we could
, which have been used by thousands. no questions will be raised over the quality of construction -- now questions will be raised of the quality of construction. this was supposed to be india's coming out party, showcasing its global power. even now, organizers insist they are on top of things. >> the situation is under control. we are doing our best. we are confident we will be able to complete the entirety of the restoration. >> but not everyone is convinced. some officials say unless india acts quickly, the event could be in jeopardy. bbc news, delhi. >> next tuesday, there will be a conference, which is not news in itself, but this one is in north korea an extremely rare. the last time it happened, 30 years ago, kim jong-il succeeded his father. now with doubts about his health, there is speculation he is about to hand over to one of his sons. we have this from the south korean capital, seoul. >> this is the only photo of kim jong-un , taken two decades ago. almost nothing is known about him except that he comes from are ruthless and powerful bloodline. kim il-sung and his son, kim
collapsed under its own way. it would have been used by thousands of pedestrians as they walked over to the main venue. now questions are being raised over the quality of construction. it was not meant to be this way. this was supposed to be india's coming out party, showcasing a global showcase. >> it is under control. we are doing our best. we are confident we will be able to complete the entire renovation and cleaning. >> but not everyone is convinced. some say unless india acts quickly, the event could be in jeopardy. bbc news, delhi. >> next tuesday, there will be a conference. that is not moving news in itself, but this one is north korea, and it is extremely rare. the last time it happened 30 years ago, it led to kim jong-il succeeding his father. there is insulation he is about to hand over to one of his sons. -- there is speculation he is about to hand over to one of his sons. >> this is an early confirmed photo of the sun, taken almost two decades ago. almost nothing is known about him except that he comes from a ruthless bloodline. the eternal president and his son kim jon
's collapse and the ensuing crisis led to a new push to make banks safer. in the u.s. a sweeping financial reform bill signed into law in july imposed stricter capital requirements on banks, yet largely left u.s. regulators to determine those levels. now new international standards may be on the way. this weekend in basil, switzerland, central bankers from 27 countries including ben bernanke agreed to new rules that included substantially raising amount of capital that banks must hold in reserve. banks in the u.s. currently must hold about 2% of their assets in capital or equity to absorb losses in the event of runs or financial panics. under the so-called basil-3 agreement the new international standard would be 7% of assets. but banks would have until 2019 to implement it. the head of the european central bank said the move would help protect against another meltdown. >> what we have decided is commensurate to permit when we have all the standards in place to make the banking sector at a global level much more resilient. and i would say we think we are commensurate to the shocks that we
economy. his speech in cleveland, ohio highlighted his administration's plans for tax cuts. the u.s. secretary of state has said mexico's struck cartels increasingly look like an -- mexico's drug cartels increasingly look like an insurgency. the army was deployed against the cartels in 2006. the father of britain's prime minister has died. david cameron is the difference on the news that his father had suffered a stroke on holiday. he reached the hospital just before his father died. a russian passenger plane carrying 81 has crash landed, but all on board are uninjured. the jet was on its way to moscow when the power supply, fuel pump, and radio and navigation all failed. the jet came to rest safely in a nearby forest. hundreds of prisoners have escaped from a local jail in central nigeria as a gang of armed men attacked it. authorities are blaming a radical islamist sect. we have this report. >> police are hunting between 700 men and 800 men on the run. the gunmen who attacked the jail went from cell to cell, using bolt cutters, then setting fire to the building. intelligence indic
cry from 1994's "contract with america," and the grand signing ceremony on the steps of the u.s. capitol. today, house republican leaders appeared in shirt sleeves at a hardware and lumber store in suburban virginia 30 miles from capitol hill with this year's policy prescriptions. minority leader john boehner and his top lieutenants spelled out their central point. >> government is out of control in washington, and we need to rein it in, and begin a new drive for a smaller, less costly and more accountable government in our nation's capital. these are the things that the american people are demanding, >> reporter: while the backdrop has changed, republicans hope their document, called "a pledge to america," will produce similar results to 1994. that year's plan helped the party gain 54 seats and take the house majority for the first time in 40 years. one of the main architects of the 2010 version is california's kevin mccarthy. he accused democrats of ignoring the country's wishes. >> from the billion dollar bailouts to the stimulus package that failed to stimulate, to the gover
about who the oil company blames and there is an interactive timeline detailing how the u.s. came to suffer its worst environmental disaster. moving around the globe now, hundreds of prisoners escaped from a jail in nigeria when armed men attacked it. authorities blamed the radical islamists sect boko haram. we have this report. police and art -- >> police are hunting men who attacked and jail. begun and it went from cell to cell, using bolt cutters, then setting fire to the building. the authorities say intelligent man -- intelligence indicates it is the work of boko haram, a radical islamists sect blindly opposed to western education. 100 other members were awaiting trial for their part in a riot last year. back then, more than 100 were killed, and the group's leader was shot dead in police custody after a siege of his camp out. -- compound. they have headquarters in the capital. but there has been unrest, too, in other states in the northwest of the country boko haram -- of the country. boko haram want the enactment of strict islamist law. it is feared that boko haram are embra
jailed in teheran, about today's release and what it tells us about the regime. >> brown: then margaret warner interviews former british prime minister and united nations envoy tony blair about the newest round of middle east peace talks. >> i find it hard to see if these two political leader s in this context with an american administration pushing for a deal, if we can't get one, i don't know where we go from there. >> ifill: fred de sam lazaro has the story of a jewish entrepreneur working with palestinians and israelis for both peace and profit. >> brown: susan dentzer of "health affairs" and karen tumulty of the "washington post" sort through the latest give- and-take on health care politics. >> ifill: and we sit down with writer and cartoonist austin kleon for a dose of poetry inspired by newspaper prose. >> what i found out is that i need to treat the newspaper as a blank canvas in order to really come up with a good poem. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions a
the dangers of secularism on his first state visit to britain. the human cost of the u.s. financial downturn as poverty levels rise to their highest level for nearly 50 years. e.u. summit row as president sarkozy lashing out against critics and vows to clear out illegal roma camps. >> french men and women have to know that this policy will continue while strictly abiding by the letter and spirit of our republican law. >> welcome to "bbc world news," broadcast to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. coming up later, women in a man's world, the dangers of being a female candidate in afghanistan's election. and pakistan's hindus river may be flowing, but not international aid. the u.n. appeals for more money. hello, it is the first state visit by a pope to britain since the 16th century when henry viii broke from rome and formed the anglican church. the pope has been forced to acknowledge failings over pedophile priests and issued a warning about the dangers of what he calls aggressive secularism in britain. we look at an occasion that matches protocol with religious fervor. >> i
the economy, but the president with a record low approval rating. >> the government is forcing us to a showdown. the only thing that can make them budget is a showdown. >> that may force the government to make further concessions, but two-thirds of the country are resigned to reforms already approved by the lower house. with the senate vote looking to be a formality, president sarkozy has the upper hand. christian fraser, bbc news, paris. >> our economy has started to shrink again. it came out of recession earlier this year. dee dee was down by 1.2% on the first quarter of the year -- gdp was down by 1.2%. youtube and its owner, googles, have one of landmark piracy case brought by a spanish tv channel. the court ruled it was the responsibility of the copyright owner to tell googol -- google that their property appeared on the youtube. the suspension of of controversial diabetes drugcontroversialavandia. -- controversial diabetes drug, avandia. it is linked to an increased risk of heart failure. it was supposed to be a showcase moment for india, showing itself to be a global power.
. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> lehrer: today's vote in the u.s. senate means the ban on gays in the military will stand, at least for now. opponents of the ban fell four votes short today in their bid to break a filibuster. >> the vote was about whether to begin debating a military budget bill. it includeded language calling for repeal of don't ask don't tell. but the republican filibuster held and the measure stayed stalled at a vote of 56-43. >> the motion is not agreed to. >> lehrer: 60 votes were needed. it came down to a handful of senators including maine republican susan collins. she backs repeal of the 17-year-old ban on gays and lesbians serving openly in the military, but she opposed a limit on amendments. >> i think we should welcome the service of these individuals who are willing and capable of serving their country. but i cannot vote to proceed to this bill under a situation that is going to shut down the debate and preclude republican amendments. that too is not fair. >> lehrer: it was clear that most republicans opposed repeal of don't as
out to sell books because of protests for one reason or the other. they use all of the sense of animus, it seems. what is it about? >> it's difficult to say, really. i mean, first of all, you know, as i always point out to people, i did win three elections rather than lose them. >> rose: (laughs) yes, you did. yes, and some say you should have quit then. >> some say i should never have started. but you can't listen to all those voices. and also, frankly, there's a huge difference between the people who will come and protest, the people no who throw things at you are not, in my book, normal people. most normal people, even though they disagree with you, have a disagreement with you, they don't feel the need to either shout at you or throw something at you, they just say "well, i disagree." there was a poll just a few days ago that showed on balance a positive appreciation of my time as prime minister. is so i think this thing is... parts of, frankly, you live as a progress progressive politician as well with parts of the right of the media can be pretty aggressive when taking you on. wh
, who covers capitol hill for "the new york times." thanks for being back with us. so what's this delay all about? >> well, the senate clearly doesn't want to get embroiled in this issue before the election. it's just too unpredictable and the story line for democrats is clean, as things stand now. they're making the case that republicans would block tax relief for the middle class to hold out for tax break force the wealthy. republicans, of course shall want to extend those tax cuts for everyone. and so it's easier in the view of democrats to push this until a lame duck session. the political situation will obviously be less intense then. but as you said, the house speaker today left open the possibility of forcing a vote. and that could get really interesting next week. >> woodruff: now why the different calculus in the senate and in the house. >> the calculus probably isn't different. the conventional wisdom still is that in the end the house will decide to go home and campaign without taking this vote. but there's no reason for speaker pelosi to relent right now when she thinks she'
distractions can one white house handle? including at the u.n. >> some sectors of the u.s. government orchestrated the attack to reversion the declining american -- reverse the declining american economy. gwen: on the senate floor. >> the appeal of don't ask-don't tell is an appeal to the gay and lesbian base. gwen: finger pointing on parade. covering the week, jackie calmes of "the new york times." naftali bendavid of "the wall street journal." tom gjelten of n.p.r. and nancy youssef of mcclatchy newspapers. >> award winning reporting and analysis covering history as it happens. live from our nation's capital, this is "washington week with gwen ifill." produced in association with national journal. funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> we know why we're here. >> to connect our forces to what they need, when they need it. >> to help troops see danger. before it sees them. >> to answer the call of the brave and bring them safely home. >> around the globe, the people of boeing are working together to support and protect all who serve. >> that's why we're here. >> funding fo
that the u.s. thinks that these countries are sponsoring terrorism. >> with most of the lucrative oil resources in the south, human rights organizations are contemplating whether the north will let the south go. >> one thing seems clear. no amount of international pressure will work unless the sudanese themselves are prepared to sort out their own province. >> and other news, the nigerian government officials say 2 million people have been displaced in the north of the country after the authorities have forced open floodgates following heavy rains. half of the population has been affected and the floodgates are opened and the water levels are dangerously high. people have been running too dry areas. the detained pro-democracy leader in burma has been included on a voters' list for the first general election in years. our election victory in 1990 was annulled by the military rulers. she is currently under house arrest and was initially excluded from the alleged moral role. the defense minister says he will put pressure on the united states to hand over the scientist who was sentenced t
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)